Nov
11
Things I Have Learnt

5 weeks at Ketchup: Things I have learnt

November 11, 2015 1:20 pm Published by Comments Off on 5 weeks at Ketchup: Things I have learnt

After spending 5 weeks at Ketchup HQ, I have had the best experiences and learnt so much about the world of Marketing and working with local businesses.  Here are some of the key messages from my time at Ketchup:

Knowledge is Power

It is vital that business owners understand who their target market is and how these clients engage with their business.  Who is your ‘typical’ or most profitable customer? What kind of lifestyle do they lead?  What brands do they buy?  The answers to these kinds of questions will inform the style and tone of the Marketing materials produced for this group and will help make sure your Marketing is appropriate for these people.  Those of you who know Michelle might have seen the Janet and John presentation…

Online – along the right lines?

While no-one can deny the importance of a professional website, not all aspects of online marketing are appropriate for every business.  Business owners tend to view social media as an efficient way to boost their business profile, but certain industries are unlikely to increase their profits by 20% simply by tweeting about their work.  For instance, cranes, labels, mezzanine floors and glue are not the sorts of posts likely to receive a record number of likes.  Babies, food and pets, however, are.  Equally, if you are going to have a Facebook or Twitter account, make sure it remains relevant and up-to-date, as it looks unprofessional if you started in earnest, but have made no effort to continue posting.

Branding: Three time’s a charm

Three really is the magic number in Marketing, with people needing to see a brand three times before remembering it.  With this in mind, businesses need to ensure their Marketing message reaches their target audience enough times.  There are many different ways of doing this, from offline A-boards to websites and online Facebook advertising.  Likewise, being creative is a great way to be memorable, such as using different shapes for your Marketing material.  However, businesses must ensure they have the money to execute a campaign effectively, and should have the 3 touch points goal in mind when budgeting.

For more insights into what I have gained from working at Ketchup, look out for my next blog.

To discuss how Ketchup Marketing can help your business, use the contact form here or visit the website for more information.

Jun
10

What price quality?

June 10, 2013 10:00 pm Published by Comments Off on What price quality?

When you’re out networking, as many busy business-owners & directors do week-in, week-out, you build up a great rapport with some of the contacts you make, and this can lead to great introductions and ultimately, convert into paid work.

It’s good practice to tweak your pitch, see what generates a good response, see what seem to hit people’s hot buttons, and then keep on honing it to perfection. Also, it pays to mix it up a bit if you’ve got a particular offer or deal, or if you’re swamped with one kind of project and need to keep your whole team busy by promoting one of your other products or services.

So the other week Michelle ventured out to networking group she’d been going to for a while.  A nice bunch of people, and a lovely venue.  We have, to be fair, been absolutely stacked in the studio with website work, so this time we’d decided in advance to promote more of the strategic marketing side of the business.

All was going well until in passing someone said how much they’d love to work with us, but that they simply couldn’t afford it. Now, alarm bells were set a-ringing by that, not because we didn’t like people to think we might be fractionally more expensive than the next agency, but because after having invested time and effort in promoting our technical expertise and great creative thinking, but because the individual concerned couldn’t see that as a general rule ‘you get what you pay for’.

There is a common misconception in small business that in order to be competitive you need to undercut the competition. No you don’t. You need to differentiate yourselves from it, add value to every stage of every transaction and deliver what you said you would at the time you said you’d deliver it. In so doing, you’re justifying the extra little bit of money you might be charging – because people are buying your expertise.

Let’s put it like this; If you’re booking a flight with a budget airline, the headline price might seem great.  But then you end up getting charged for your hand luggage, charged to book your seat, charged if you check in at the airport, charged for your in-flight meal, charged extra to pay by debit card or credit card when you pay… and actually it adds up to double what you originally thought. Whereas if you booked with a non-budget airline, the ticket price you pay includes all of those extras. The same applies when you’re choosing your agency.

So yes, it’s true that we aren’t the kind of agency that promotes an inexpensive service. There is a perception that perhaps we are more expensive than the next agency. But it’s funny how things transpire… a couple of projects we’d lost based on price earlier this year are now back with us. So perhaps alarm bells needn’t have rung quite so loudly after all.

If you’d like to have a chat with Michelle, and get a quote for marketing strategy, a new website, social media management, email marketing or SEO… then pick up the phone and dial 0330 088 9277.  After she’s gently grilled you (!) to make sure you know what you want, she’ll  meet you to get a clear understanding of your business & she’ll prepare a no obligation quote for you.  And if you go ahead with your project, unless you suddenly ask for something extra, they price you are quoted is the price you’ll pay.

Simple as that!

Apr
24

It’s a civil partnership. Usually

April 24, 2012 5:15 pm Published by Comments Off on It’s a civil partnership. Usually

Michelle – Ketchup MD

The dodgy sex aside, I sometimes think that long term client relationships are a bit like marriages. Both parties enter into them with eyes wide open and with the best of intentions; and learn to adjust their expectations as time passes.

At first it’s all passion and togetherness discovered. There are a couple of warm discussions as you feel your way around and operational guidelines are laid down.

 

Then something wonderful happens

Like all seasoned couples, you become perfectly aligned. The agency is so immersed in the client’s market that it responds to new challenges instinctively. Our creative/management team thinks proactively – without being briefed – to present new directions, ground-breaking ideas and early solutions to future issues. In short, we all work together in shorthand.

Blind date? Actually we met on the internet

A good number of our clients have been with us for over 5 years, some for even longer. Most of our new clients come to us via recommendations from established clients, or people who have worked with us previously. Which is gratifying.

But we do go on blind dates – or pitches, as they’re known in the industry. We also attract new business via the net and targeted marketing efforts. Lucky really, because if we can’t market ourselves…

Taking it personally

Gary – Ketchup Design Guru

And sometimes the personal partner merges with the professional. Our Director of Copy married his Art Director and our Creative Director met his intended over the garden wall when they were children, but he designed all my wedding stationery and table layouts. And our longest standing client was at the ceremony some – oooh – 13 years ago now.

There’s a lot to be said for long term relationships.

 

 

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